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 New York based practice for architecture, design and research led by Lydia Xynogala


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• 253 West 76 Street, #7
  New York, NY 10023 
•  info@alos.nyc


Mark

Return of La Belle Jardinière
(Homage to Women)


Part landscape, part female body and part architecture, these cast objects are an homage to Max Ernst’s The Return of La Belle Jardinière (1967).   The Green Life, Group Show participation, LMAK Gallery
New York
March 27, 2019 - June 9, 2019.





















Inconspicuously situated between landscape and architecture is the jardinière or planter; it is an overlooked typology, yet it is a ubiquitous form throughout art and architecture imagery.
A crossover between landscape, interior furniture and small pavilion,

in the 19th century la jardinière expresses the anxiety to “annihilate space”

as the historian Siegfried Gideon points out. For Gideon jardinieres are a “gentle unreal play of dream elements that the eye delights to follow- as irrational as the sphinxes tails, curling into arabesques that sprout a thin stem balancing a vase.”

Throughout the history of art, garden imagery has alluded to the female gardener, the “jardinière”. She is often depicted as Madonna in the iconographical tradition of the Virgin as a fertile, enclosed garden and associated with certain flowers. This idea of the jardinière is also objectified in a vessel carrying plants.
The jardinieres in these series  allude to architectures, landscapes and female body parts: knees, thighs, fortifications, breasts, grottos, caves, elbows, roofs, buttocks, mountains, glutes, domes, ruins...Just as a traditional jardiniere they can stand for themselves as objects and be utilized as vessels for plants.

They are planted with Mother of Thousands, a succulent that produces vegetatively in large numbers by creating small off springs on her leaves. The babies start growing roots and photosynthesizing before they reach the earth. Because of this she has the ability to behave as a weed  dominating and crowding out other species that have less efficient means of propagation. 


Plant Life by Simone Frazier, an artist and horticulturalist, founder of Open Source Landscape


Storefront Souvenir:
Exploded Fortress of Solitude



Commision by the Storefront for Art and Architecture for the exhibition

Souvenirs: New York Icons Sept. 16-Dec. 9, 2017

















Exhibition Text:

“First Stop South Bronx. These buildings do bear an amazing resemblance to the buttes of Utah. And it is wonderful how things have sped up. When the condemned structures are dynamited, I can see in a few minutes the erosion that in nature would take countless eons. The sight is indeed awe-inspiring.”
    —Mike Kelley





Approaching the long narrow strait of the south Bronx a solitary fortress emerges in the horizon. Attracting visitors from Manhattan or coming from the nearby Randall’s island Art Fair, passing boats in the waters of Bronx Kills dock momentarily to admire the magnificent view. In Port Morris, the resident artist community enjoys this new dramatic scenery. There, it is, the large printing facility of New York Post where it once constructed stories, myths and other facts. Years of misinformation have formed thick layers over the surface of actual events.

12,000 tons of waste were routed to the South Bronx, at a rate of 2-3 trucks per minute to be dispersed in the numerous recycling facilities nearby. Construction debris, concrete, dirt, brick, rocks, asphalt. One day they started to slowly pile up on top of the Post. Soon, other local waste followed. Nearby oil refineries joined in and even the brewery. The press stopped printing. Fermentation and molding ensued. This fortress is now in a state of erosion. Crushed slabs, sand and stone and even demolished monuments.

Developer plans for the waterfront and renaming the area the Piano District are scrapped. The nearby film studio is shooting new Westerns. As floods increase the mount becomes a refuge. While everyone is lamenting the loss of the Village Voice, this new composite taking over the Post is sparking joy throughout the City.


Team: Lydia Xynogala, Clara Dykstra


À Rebours Bed



against the grain, contrasting plywood grains with ledge






Stationary Stationery



A collection of concrete objects for desks, too heavy for anything else, they remain stationary.



Majestic Cabinet


Entry concept for an Art collector’s apartment at the Majestic on Central Park West






In Progress